Kamco maintains New York state of mind

Brooklyn, N.Y. — When David Kovacs talks about some of the building projects in and around his city, his eyes light up.

For starters, there’s a $15 billion Hudson Yards project on the west side of Manhattan. There’s the redevelopment of the famous South Street Seaport. In Queens, developers have huge plans for Willets Point surrounding the new Citi Field, home of baseball’s New York Mets. And there’s still a lot of work yet to be done at the World Trade Center site.

“When you look around New York City, you see some large, mega projects in the works,” said Kovacs, VP of Brooklyn-based Kamco Supply, a four-unit full-line distributor of commercial and residential building products. But there are no guarantees in the highly competitive New York market. For Kamco, one way to make it here, Kovacs says, is through dependable deliveries and quality service. “Our philosophy is to become the easiest distributor to do business with, and they’ll come back,” he said.

Another strategy is to keep the new products coming. “A lot of times when a vendor comes out with something new, they come to our door pretty quickly,” Kovacs said. “And we think it’s important to have new products to deliver to our customer on a regular basis.”

Some of those new products were on display at Kamco’s second annual Customer Appreciation & Vendor Showcase event. One of the highlight booths was a display of an innovative service called Kamco Drywall Forms. With specialized drywall saws and machinery, the service creates soffits, light coves, column enclosures and other complex shapes — and it creates them seamlessly.

“It’s a big hit,” said Kovacs. “It saves a lot of time, a lot of labor. And it comes out a lot more professional looking then if you did it by hand.”

Kamco’s product mix also features Armstorn and USG Acoustical Ceiling Systems, light gauge steel framing, drywall, lumber, insulation and many other products.

While the opportunities for business in the biggest city in the United States are enormous, operating in the urban jungle can be challenging.

“It’s doing all the little things that make us better,” Kovacs said.