Content about National Labor Relations Act

August 26, 2012

Few stances have riled employers this summer more than the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) position that employee handbooks with language about at-will employment may violate the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). This position, which Kent Jones, an attorney with Nixon Peabody in San Francisco, characterized in an interview with SHRM Online as “a terrible stretch,” applies to all employers -- unionized or not.

The NLRB floated this theory in a pair of cases earlier this year at the Phoenix regional office.

June 11, 2012

In a May 30, 2012 report whose guidance is likely to be challenged in the courts, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) cautioned that it believes that many clauses common in social media policies violate the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

While Acting General Counsel Lafe Solomon’s report outlined six cases where it found clauses in employers’ social media policies to violate Section 7 of the NLRA, it provided in full one social media policy that was deemed lawful in its entirety.

May 1, 2012

A rule that would have forced most U.S. employers to post a notice of employees' rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) has been temporarily blocked by a federal circuit court.

The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia on April 17 granted an emergency injunction pending the appeal of a prior D.C. district court ruling that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) had authority to issue the poster requirement, but had no ability to punish an employer for failure to comply.

April 27, 2012

A decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia (D.C.) Circuit Court has delayed a new rule — set to take effect April 30 — that required workplaces to post right-to-organize notices.

To be in compliance with the new rule, private employers will have to post an 11-in.-by-17-in. notice regarding employee rights to unionize under the National Labor Relations Act. The requirement was set by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).

April 18, 2012

A decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia (D.C.) Circuit Court has delayed a new rule -- set to take effect April 30 -- that required workplaces to post right-to-organize notices.

To be in compliance with the new rule, private employers will have to post an 11-by-17-in. notice regarding employee rights to unionize under the National Labor Relations Act. The requirement was set by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).

March 23, 2012

A federal district court decision on a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rule requiring employers to post notices informing workers of their right to unionize could have a wide-reaching impact on most U.S. employers and their workers, according to experts.